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dc.contributor.authorVuleta, Ana
dc.contributor.authorManitašević Jovanović, Sanja
dc.contributor.authorTucić, Branka
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-16T09:04:20Z
dc.date.available2017-03-16T09:04:20Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26841194
dc.identifier.urihttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0981942816300109
dc.identifier.urihttp://ibiss-r.rcub.bg.ac.rs/123456789/2597
dc.description.abstractHigh solar radiation has been recognized as one of the main causes of the overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress in plants. To remove the excess of ROS, plants use different antioxidants and tune their activity and/or isoform number as required for given light conditions. In this study, the adaptiveness of light-induced variation in the activities and isoform patterns of key enzymatic antioxidants SOD, APX and CAT was tested in leaves of Iris pumila clonal plants from two natural populations inhabiting a sun exposed dune site and a forest understory, using a reciprocal-transplant experiment. At the exposed habitat, the mean enzymatic activity of total SODs was significantly greater than that in the shaded one, while the amount of the mitochondrial MnSOD was notably higher compared to the plastidic Cu/ZnSOD. However, the number of Cu/ZnSOD isoforms was greater in the forest understory relative to the exposed site (three vs. two, respectively). An inverse relationship recorded between the quantities of MnSOD and Cu/ZnSOD in alternative light habitats might indicate that the two enzymes compensate each other in maintaining intracellular ROS and redox balance. The adaptive population differentiation in APX activity was exclusively recorded in the open habitat, which indicated that the synergistic effect of high light and temperature stress could be the principal selective factor, rather than high light alone. The enzymatic activity of CAT was similar between the two populations, implicating APX as the primary H2O2 scavenger in the I. pumila leaves exposed to high light intensity.
dc.sourcePlant Physiology and Biochemistry
dc.subjectAdaptive phenotypic plasticity
dc.subjectAscorbate peroxidase
dc.subjectCatalase
dc.subjectIris pumila
dc.subjectLocal adaptation
dc.subjectReciprocal transplant experiment
dc.subjectSuperoxide dismutase
dc.subject.otherm21
dc.titleAdaptive flexibility of enzymatic antioxidants SOD, APX and CAT to high light stress: The clonal perennial monocot Iris pumila as a study case
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.plaphy.2016.01.011
dc.identifier.wos000371553500018
dc.citation.volume100
dc.citation.spage166
dc.citation.epage173
dc.identifier.pmid26841194
dc.citation.apaVuleta, A., Manitašević Jovanović, S., & Tucić, B. (2016). Adaptive flexibility of enzymatic antioxidants SOD, APX and CAT to high light stress: The clonal perennial monocot Iris pumila as a study case. Plant Physiology and Biochemistry, 100, 166–173.
dc.citation.vancouverVuleta A, Manitašević Jovanović S, Tucić B. Adaptive flexibility of enzymatic antioxidants SOD, APX and CAT to high light stress: The clonal perennial monocot Iris pumila as a study case. Plant Physiol Biochem. 2016;100:166–73.
dc.description.otherPlant Physiology and Biochemistry (2016), 100: 166-173
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-84958247837


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